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Synchronous Lesson Evaluation Instrument

April 17th, 2012 Comments off

Synchronous Lesson Evaluation Instrument

  • 10 Points.  Lesson delivery was smooth and there seemed to be no technological issues on the instructor’s end.
  • 20 Points.  Appropriate methods for recognizing student interaction / involvement (i.e. virtual hand raising) was employed.
  • 10 Points. Appropriate methods were in place to encourage all students to participate.
  • 10 Points. Adequate time was given for students to participate before moving on.
  • 20 Points. The instructor involved the entire class in the activities / discussions.
  • 20 Points. A variety of questioning methods were used including direct and indirect questioning, surveys, polls, and quizzes / knowledge checks.
  • 10 Points. Appropriate methods of assessment were used and were delivered free from any technological issues.
Evaluation of Plagiarism Lesson
  • 10 Points.  Lesson delivery was smooth and there seemed to be no technological issues on the instructor’s end.  5/10.  The beginning of the lesson was rough and a lot of dead air.
  • 20 Points.  Appropriate methods for recognizing student interaction / involvement (i.e. virtual hand raising) was employed. 15/20.  I didn’t see any real interaction.
  • 10 Points. Appropriate methods were in place to encourage all students to participate. 10/10.
  • 10 Points. Adequate time was given for students to participate before moving on. 5/10.  I felt very rushed.
  • 20 Points. The instructor involved the entire class in the activities / discussions. 20/20.
  • 20 Points. A variety of questioning methods were used including direct and indirect questioning, surveys, polls, and quizzes / knowledge checks. 10/20 I didn’t see many opportunities for direct questioning or at least it wasn’t really modeled.
  • 10 Points. Appropriate methods of assessment were used and were delivered free from any technological issues. 10/10.

Total 75/75

Evaluation of Icebreaker Activity

  • 10 Points.  Lesson delivery was smooth and there seemed to be no technological issues on the instructor’s end.   5/10.  Intro was somewhat smooth, but the visual was cutoff.
  • 20 Points.  Appropriate methods for recognizing student interaction / involvement (i.e. virtual hand raising) was employed. 20/20.
  • 10 Points. Appropriate methods were in place to encourage all students to participate. 10/10.
  • 10 Points. Adequate time was given for students to participate before moving on. 10/10.
  • 20 Points. The instructor involved the entire class in the activities / discussions. 20/20.
  • 20 Points. A variety of questioning methods were used including direct and indirect questioning, surveys, polls, and quizzes / knowledge checks. 20/20.
  • 10 Points. Appropriate methods of assessment were used and were delivered free from any technological issues.  10/10.
Total – 95/100
Categories: General Reflection Tags: ,

 


Module 5 Reflection and Summary

April 17th, 2012 Comments off

Synchronous learning is something that we have grown up with and that we are familiar with since we participated in it every day that we say in classrooms during our time in elementary, junior high and high school as well as many college classes.  While this trend is starting to change the majority of us still experience it on a regular basis.  It is only natural to want to use synchronous learning in the online environment and at times it may even be more appropriate.

During module 5 I explored the confines of adobe connect and I found that it is a particularly effective method of delivering synchronous learning.  It has many tools that would make the facilitation of a lesson easier like the breakout rooms, shared whiteboard, chat function as well as support for audio and video if necessary.  The downside is that a dedicated server is needed and some technological expertise is needed for an instructor to adequately deliver a lesson using it.  I found that some other services / websites might offer alternative methods.  One that I have been very interested in is Facebook.  I know.  It sounds crazy, but many students use it.  It has the ability to host private chats that can include multiple participants.  It has the ability to have postings and other comments.  It has the ability to include video, photos, and audio as well as video conferencing.   It has potential and I am exploring it.

I worked with my partner to develop a lesson plan for a synchronous lesson.  I found that experience to be quite enjoyable.  I’ve always enjoyed planning.  I found it beneficial as well that my partner is a friend and colleague that I did undergraduate work with, so we already had a good working relationship.

I think that the synchronous evaluation tool is helpful because it really made me think about what is a good lesson.  For the most part, I found that what was expected to be good in a traditional lesson could and should carry over into a synchronously delivered online lesson.   The main difference is that the delivery method is more prone to technological issues.  This is something that has to be considered and planned for.  What happens if all of the student’s audio doesn’t work?  What happens if the instructor loses an internet connection?  These types of problems don’t present in a traditional classroom.  I think that one of the best methods to this is to practice and have reliable and maintained equipment.

I evaluated two of the recorded lessons and for the most part found them adequate.  I looked at the lesson on plagiarism and I like that he would split the class into three groups that looked at different things and then reported back to the class.  I also liked how the groups then would have a class discussion.  This type of teaching is very appropriate and helps students not only build bonds between themselves but also to learn from each other.  Now with that being said, I feel that this lesson could have been much more affective as an asynchronous lesson.  The groups could collaborate via email, chat, and message boards to research and synthesize their findings and then they could have posted their findings in another discussion forum.  The entire class could have then come together asynchronously via a discussion forum to debate and discuss the issues.  The PowerPoint could have still been used to deliver lesson content.  This type of lesson needs careful consideration and I don’t feel that the students would have had enough time to really sink their teeth into it.

The second lesson that I looked at was the icebreaker.  This lesson was perfect for synchronous delivery.  It was intended for students to get to know each other and there is no better way than direct synchronous interaction.  This lesson could have been conducted asynchronously but the effect would not have been as immediate or as real.

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